Our Latest Testimonial

Steve Miller —  June 20, 2014

Our latest testimonial:

“Best part of our trip !
Thank you”

from Lyndon Zimmerman, June 19, 2014

Rio Grande Rising!

Steve Miller —  March 31, 2015

Rio Grande Rising! The river is at 1360 cfs today, and going up. It’s time to go rafting! Here’s a photo of Powerline Falls, in the Taos Box, taken a week ago. The Box is priced at $110, Sunday thru Friday.

The steep drop into Powerline Falls

The steep drop into Powerline Falls

The Rio Grande Racecourse

Steve Miller —  March 28, 2015

The Rio Grande Racecourse, March 28, 2015. It’s still March, for crying out loud, and we’re having temps in the mid-70s, and 1200+ cfs in the river! Wow, what great conditions for running some whitewater. Today, Britt took these three lovely ladies down the Racecourse run.

Jaymie (on the right) brought two friends up from Albuquerque

Jaymie (on the right) brought two friends up from Albuquerque

Here they are, with Britt, getting started

Here they are, with Britt, getting started

 

Habitat For Humanity on the Rio Grande! A group of students from UC-Berkeley spent the Spring Break building homes in Taos, NM, for Habitat For Humanity, and then treated themselves to a raft trip on the Racecourse section of the Rio Grande. The river is now running at about 1300 cfs, which provides lots of good waves. Their guides were Britt Runyon and Joe Cameron.

14 students from UC-Berkeley, beside the Rio Grande

14 students from UC-Berkeley, beside the Rio Grande

The big Sleeping Beauty wave

The big Sleeping Beauty wave – Joe’s boat

First Taos Box trip of 2015! Today, March 21, was Kathy’s birthday (Kathy Miller, Pres. of NWR ), and she wanted to run the Box. What a great idea! The forecast was for a high in the mid-60s and clear. This is the earliest we have ever run the Box, thanks to global warming. We were joined by NWR staff Britt, CJ, Joe, Adrien and trainee Michele. Britt and I were in an oar boat, and the others in a paddle boat. The river was running 1400 cfs, and the trip went off without a hitch, taking just a little over 3 hours. We had the river to ourselves, except for some wildlife, which included a group of bighorn sheep, canada geese, mergansers, green-winged teal, a redtail hawk, canyon wrens and a muskrat that dived under our boat. Mayflies were out, but it was still too early for the migratory songbirds.

The put-in, at John Dunn Bridge

The put-in, at John Dunn Bridge

Sculpted and polished basalt boulder

Sculpted and polished basalt boulder

Sculpted and polished basalt boulder, side view

Sculpted and polished basalt boulder, side view

The Rio Grande Gorge High Bridge

The Rio Grande Gorge High Bridge

Yellow Bank Rapid

Yellow Bank Rapid

60 Mile/Hr Rapid

60 Mile/Hr Rapid

The tight squeeze at the entry to Dead Car Rapid

The tight squeeze at the entry to Dead Car Rapid

Watch out for the big rock, in Dead Car Rapid

Watch out for the big rock, in Dead Car Rapid

The steep drop into Powerline Falls

The steep drop into Powerline Falls

Sharkfin Rock, in the Rock Garden Rapid

Sharkfin Rock, in the Rock Garden Rapid

Buzzsaw Rapid

Buzzsaw Rapid

Ugly Rock

Ugly Rock

 Screaming Left Turn Rapid

Screaming Left Turn Rapid

Mitch's Bitch rock in the Boulder Field section.

Mitch’s Bitch rock in the Boulder Field section.

Screaming Right Turn Rapid

Screaming Right Turn Rapid

Screaming Right Turn Rapid

Screaming Right Turn Rapid

 Sculpted basalt rock

Sculpted basalt rock

Taos Creek enters the Rio Grande at Taos Junction Rapid

Taos Creek enters the Rio Grande at Taos Junction Rapid

The Rio Grande flow has surpassed 900 cfs at Taos Junction Bridge, which makes for excellent boating in the Taos Box, the premier whitewater run in New Mexico. This Class 4 run is 16 miles in length, and passes below the Rio Grande Gorge High Bridge at a point 4 miles downstream of the put-in, which is located at the John Dunn Bridge, at the mouth of Arroyo Hondo, north of Taos. The Rio Hondo drains the Sangre de Cristo mountains to the east, which contain Wheeler Pk, the highest in the state, and the Taos Ski Valley. We don’t know how long this initial phase of the run-off will continue. At some point, upstream irrigation begins, lessening the flows that we downstream users receive. So this is a great early opportunity to boat the Box. Call your friends and arrange a Box trip with New Wave. We provide wet suits, wet suit booties and a great buffet-style lunch. Experience the centerpiece of the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument, the Taos Box!

Powerline Falls, which begins the wild final 4-mile section of the Taos Box run

Powerline Falls, which begins the wild final 4-mile section of the Taos Box run

Passing to the right of Camel Rock, in Rock Garden rapid

Passing to the right of Camel Rock, in Rock Garden rapid

Kathy's Cleaver, named for NWR President Kathy Miller

Kathy’s Cleaver, named for NWR President Kathy Miller

Miller Time, in Boulder Field rapid

Miller Time, in Boulder Field rapid

Upstream view rounding the corner of Screaming Left

Upstream view rounding the corner of Screaming Left

Taos Junction Rapid, the final rapid of the Taos Box

Taos Junction Rapid, where Taos Creek (left) joins the Rio Grande

The River is Rising

Steve Miller —  March 18, 2015

The river is rising, and New Wave is open for business! It’s been a warm winter, punctuated by big snowstorms. The “new normal”? Well, we don’t mind the big snowstorm part of it. With a temperature of 75 degrees at the river yesterday (March 16), the snowpack is beginning to melt, and the river is rising. As of this evening (March 17), the Racecourse run on the Rio Grande is seeing 818 cubic feet per second (cfs). And this is enough water to run the Taos Box, so we’re hoping to get some calls for trips there. The river should continue to rise until the farmers upstream in Colorado begin to divert water, which lessens the amount of water we see down here in New Mexico. Who knows when that will happen? Still and all, the most predictable high water of the season should occur in the first half of June. Stay tuned.

Herringbone rapid

Herringbone rapid on the Racecourse run, March 11, 2015

Neil's boat approaching  Camel Rock

Neil’s boat approaching Camel Rock, on the Taos Box run of the Rio Grande, 2014

Spring Break is for Rafting too! Today, March 12, 2015, we had the Ellisons, from El Paso, doing the all-day Rio Grande Gorge trip, and they were joined by the Speights, from Virginia, for the Racecourse afternoon portion. The Speights, a Navy couple, received our military discount of 20% off. And, they informed us that they were on their honeymoon! They thought it was pretty cool that they could combine skiing and rafting on one vacation trip. In years past, we wouldn’t open New Wave for Spring Break, and I (along with Kathy) would be teaching skiing instead. This Spring Break Kathy is up at Taos Ski Valley while I run the New Wave office and drive shuttle. The high today was 65 deg. and balmy. The party spotted an otter on the Racecourse portion, in the afternoon.

One of the easy rapids on the Float portion of the full-day Rio Grande Gorge trip is called "S-turn"

One of the easy rapids on the Float portion of the full-day Rio Grande Gorge trip is called “S-turn”

The Speights, on the right, join the Ellisons in the afternoon.

The Speights, on the right, join the Ellisons in the afternoon. To the left is their guide, Sancho.

Heading down the Racecourse run

Heading down the Racecourse run

Spring Break on the Rio Grande continues! Today we had the Griffin family, from Chandler, AZ, on the morning New Wave No Wave float trip. It was Mom and Dad and their four youngsters. This trip takes place in the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument. Sancho was their guide. In the afternoon, we had the Contreras family, from El Paso, again with Sancho, on the Racecourse run. Today’s high was 66 degrees, without a breath of wind. Gorgeous!

The Griffen family, on the New Wave No Wave float trip

The Griffen family, on the New Wave No Wave float trip

Well, there were a few waves, at the S-Turn rapid

Well, there were a few waves, at the S-Turn rapid

The Contreras family, from El Paso

The Contreras family, from El Paso

The first Racecourse Trip of 2015! For the first time in our history, we opened for Spring Break. This has been a warm winter, and today’s high temp was 64 degrees. The Rio Grande was at 600 cfs. and clear, without a breath of wind. While waiting for the arrival of the raft above Saddle Rock rapid, I spotted an otter, and got a photo (not a great one though). It was a drop-dead gorgeous day. Here’s the Consford family, from Keller TX. The trip was guided by “Sancho Panza” Wilson, who is now in her third year of guiding with New Wave, and this was her first solo trip. She did great! Congrats Sancho.

Put-inMar102015_4518

Upstream view towards the put-in

Upstream view towards the put-in

Otter, below Saddle Rock rapid

Otter, below Saddle Rock rapid

Herringbone rapid

Herringbone rapid

Herringbone rapid

Herringbone rapid

Final Drop rapid

Final Drop rapid

The Swinging Bridge

The Swinging Bridge

Below After Five riffle

Below After Five riffle

Sleeping Beauty rapid

Sleeping Beauty rapid

SnackMar102015_4559

Open for business!

Steve Miller —  February 25, 2015

As of today, March 7, we are open for business! The Rio Grande is running at 600 cfs. and we’ll have temps in the low 60s.

The kids from Sunset Canyon Baptist Church. Photo by Britt Runyon

The kids from Sunset Canyon Baptist Church. Photo by Britt Runyon