Rio Grande del Norte Nat. Mon. poster. Here’s some new art work for the Monument. Which of our trips traverse sections of the Monument.? The Taos Box, and downstream, the Monument Scenic Float. Looks great, doesn’t it?

 

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Texas Tech, April 11, 2015. Today, we had a fun group from Texas Tech, in Lubbock. They did the full-day Rio Grande Gorge trip. The guides were: Britt, CJ, Joe and Mike. Today’s high was 74 degrees. A beautiful day!

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At the Lone Juniper put-in, just upstream from the Rio Bravo CG, where the group is camping

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Proud of his good looks!

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Proud of his tattoos

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Proud of their tattoos

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Mike’s boat

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CJ’s boat

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Britt’s boat

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Off they go on the gentle float through the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument. In the PM they’ll do the Racecourse rapids.

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Joe’s boat

 

 

 

 

Taos Box, 4-6-15

Britt Runyon —  April 7, 2015

Taos Box, 4-6-15. Britt Runyon is at it again, guiding a paddle boat down the Box and taking superlative photos (as I’m sure you will agree) along the way. That’s what I call multi-tasking! Also guiding on this trip of 6 was Joe Cameron. Besides the bighorns seen along the river’s banks, the party saw nesting water ouzels at Ouzel Rapid – named, as you would imagine, for the fact that ouzels nest every year in the rocks just a few feet above the whitewater of the rapid. Photos by Britt Runyon. Text by Steve Miller.

The Crew in the Taos Box.

At the put-in, just upstream of John Dunn bridge

Gorge Bridge, Bighorn Sheep and Raft

Gorge Bridge, Bighorn Sheep and raft

Bighorn rams

Bighorn rams

Rafting the Taos Box

Joe Cameron, taking the drop in Dead Car Rapid, Taos Box

 

 

Latest Testimonial – Brad M. –  “Hello Steve, thanks for the great pics! We had an awesome time. And Britt was great. We’ll see y’all again!
Brad”

The photos I provided to Brad were seen on the blog of 4/3/15. I’ve been photographing most of our guests while doing the shuttle, since the photography company has yet to start up:

http://www.newwaverafting.com/blog/rio-grande-racecourse-4315/WavingApr032015_5240

Cast of Lava Flow Pattern. Appearing in yesterday’s blog was a photo of a basalt boulder, showing a preserved lava flow pattern. Basalt is the name given to the rock that forms from a very common type of lava. Basaltic lava is called “pahoehoe” in Hawaii. It flows with the consistency of pancake batter, and preserves flow patterns when it hardens. The pattern seen in this boulder is in fact a “cast”. It was formed when lava flowed over a hardened prior flow that had a preserved flow pattern on its surface. This pattern constituted the “mold”. Ultimately, the boulder broke in such a way as to reveal the cast.

Cast of lava flow pattern

Cast of lava flow pattern

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Solidified flow pattern in what is called “ropy lava”

Gallegos Family Runs the Rio, 4/4/15. Pia, Alma and Che Gallegos came up from Albuquerque to run the Racecourse with us today. It was a little chillier than usual, and the river was running about 1000 cfs. Britt Runyon guided the raft.

As I drove away from the County Line, after completing the shuttle, some color caught my eye. I did a U-turn at the next pull-out and returned to the spot to see a blooming sweet vetch close up to a favorite boulder of mine. This boulder has a reddish facet that preserves the surface detail of flowing lava. The swirls seen on the rock are the flow patterns in the lava, just before it came to rest and cooled. You can see the same kinds of patterns in the lava that has poured out of vents in Volcanoes NP, on the Big Island of Hawaii.

Gallegos family. From the left: Pia, Alma and Che

Gallegos family. From the left: Pia, Alma and Che

One of the first of the Spring wildflowers, Sweet vetch blooms beside a basalt boulder. The reddish facet of the boulder shows the original swirls as the flowing lava came to rest.

One of the first of the Spring wildflowers, Sweet vetch blooms beside a basalt boulder. The reddish facet of the boulder shows the original swirls as the flowing lava came to rest.

Rio Grande Racecourse, 4/3/15. The Moore family, of the Duke City (Albuquerque), joined us for the PM Racecourse trip today. The river was running at 1300 cfs. Britt Runyon was their guide.

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Rio Grande now running at 1470 cfs, and going up. The melt continues to accelerate! With dire predictions for the later run-off, this is the time to run the Rio Grande, and especially the Taos Box. Seen below is Dead Car rapid, which precedes Powerline Falls. It’s named for a vehicle that was pushed off the western rim and now rests on the talus slope below.

The tight squeeze at the entry to Dead Car Rapid

The tight squeeze at the entry to Dead Car Rapid

Rio Grande Rising!

Steve Miller —  March 31, 2015

Rio Grande Rising! The river is at 1360 cfs today, and going up. It’s time to go rafting! Here’s a photo of Powerline Falls, in the Taos Box, taken a week ago. The Box is priced at $110, Sunday thru Friday.

The steep drop into Powerline Falls

The steep drop into Powerline Falls

The Rio Grande Racecourse

Steve Miller —  March 28, 2015

The Rio Grande Racecourse, March 28, 2015. It’s still March, for crying out loud, and we’re having temps in the mid-70s, and 1200+ cfs in the river! Wow, what great conditions for running some whitewater. Today, Britt took these three lovely ladies down the Racecourse run.

Jaymie (on the right) brought two friends up from Albuquerque

Jaymie (on the right) brought two friends up from Albuquerque

Here they are, with Britt, getting started

Here they are, with Britt, getting started