Testimonial – July 25, 2016

“I had a great time with our guide Joey. We did some raft surfing and had a great time in general.” – Will Steger review in Google My Business, July 25, 2016.
What is “raft surfing”, you ask. Well, at low water, such as we have now (late July), we can play in various river features, including small pour-overs. A pour-over is where water pours over a rock, as a small waterfall. We bring the bow of the raft into that mini-waterfall, and it holds onto the raft for a short while. Here’s a photo of raft surfing:

The other raft was captained by Neil Oberheide. Here, they are surfing the hole below the bridge

Raft surfing in the Taos Box.

Raft surfing on the Racecourse run

Raft surfing on the Racecourse run

And …

A vintage NWRCo t-shirt, being worn by a happy return customer

A vintage NWRCo t-shirt, being worn by a happy return customer

Testimonial, Taos Box, 6/30/16

GREAT!  Sheep, Otters!  Nice people, good guide, overcast day.  What’s not to love?  Thanks so much.  Oh, and no swimmers!    Nancy, John, Anna and Maria. Photos courtesy of Nancy Bittner.
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Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep

Jesse, in front, and Joe

Jesse, in front, and Joe, at the take-out

The Taos Box is still going good. Don’t miss it!

Orlando Torres

Orlando Torres

Orlando is “THE MAN” – Testimonials from Google My Business, 6/20/16

“We did the Taos Box. This trip was one of the best outdoors trips I’ve done in my life. If you picture white water rafting this is what you are thinking about. Easily the best thing to do in New Mexico. Make sure your as for Orlando as your guide. He knows a lot about the landscape and hits the rapids the hardest.”

Austin Scigliano, 6/20/16

“By far the best thing I have done in New Mexico! I went on the Taos Box trip with some friends and let me say not only was it adventurous but taking in the landscape was breathtaking. Orlando is the best guide and also THE MAN. He knew a ton of interesting facts about the river involving the geogrpahy and history and Orlando truly showed that he cared about the river and knew how to have the most fun. An experience to remember and well worth the price.”

Julian Martinez, 6/20/16

Just who is Orlando? Orlando Torres is a native of Taos. Besides being a raft guide, he and his wife Nicole create extravagant jewelry built around semi-precious stones. In the winter, Orlando teaches snowboarding at Taos Ski Valley.

Testimonials – 2016

Steve Miller —  June 11, 2016

Here is a selection of testimonials received this season.

  1. “Had a great time…we’ll be back.Thank you very much for the hat and shirts.” Mark Ford, Jr.
  2. “The trip was a highlight of my life. My team loved the experience too. Deb at cimarron inn, cimarron, recommended you after investigating for me. You have a great reputation!” LuAnn Walters
  3. “Today was the best trip of many…” Marge Barrett
  4. Steve,
    Thanks for the kayak rental today!  We had a blast–perfect combo of relaxed floating down the river interspersed with periods of exciting rapids (ok, only level 2, maybe 3 but fun just the same!).
    Monica

Our guests don’t just have a good time … they have a great time! 75% of our business comes from return customers and word of mouth. Give us a try. Seeing is believing. We’ve been in business since 1980 – that’s 36 years – and know how to put smiles on peoples’ faces.

Dead Car rapid, in the Taos Box

Dead Car rapid, in the Taos Box

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The kids from Sunset Canyon Baptist Church. Photo by Britt Runyon

The kids from Sunset Canyon Baptist Church. Photo by Britt Runyon

Steve Miller, VP

New Wave Guides, May 2016. We’re proud of our guys, and here are five of them, after returning from a Racecourse trip a few days ago.

Guides

Guides

From left to right: Jarrod is from Texas, and works at the Taos Ski and Snowboard School in the winter; Joey is a graduate student at UNM in mathematics; Orlando is a jeweler, and works at the Taos Ski and Snowboard School in the winter; Joe works at the Taos Ski and Snowboard School in the winter and Mike is a former Army ranger and was once celebrated as Santa Fe’s Man of the Year, for disrupting an armed robbery.

With the exception of Joe, all of those seen here initially went through our Guide Training Program. Joe switched over to New Wave from another company. Mike has been with us for over 20 yrs.

 

 

 

 

Fresh Smoked Meats Now Available at Pilar Yacht Club. No doubt you already know of the Pilar Yacht Club, an establishment that has been serving the needs of Rio Grande boaters for decades. Located at the intersection of State Hwy 68 and Hwy 570, it is 100 yards from the Rio Grande Gorge Visitor Center and a quarter mile from the Quartzite put-in for the Racecourse run. Hwy 570 takes you to the Orilla Verde section of the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument.  The PYC is run by the very hospitable Rico Salazar and his wife Eva Behrens, and here is Rico, with his new partner Jim and Jim’s mobile smoker, smoking away. Wow! I can hardly wait to sink my teeth into some of that smoked meat. We’ll see you there.

As of today (May 21, 2016), Memorial Day weekend is fast approaching, and New Wave still has spots available for rafting on the weekend. We have an above average flow at Taos Junction bridge of 1390 cfs (cubic feet per second), which is a very fun level for the Taos Box run. If you have never run the Box, this is an appropriate level for your first time, because it is relatively easy, compared to when the water is higher. The weather forecast for the Memorial Day weekend is sunny, with temperatures in the 70s and 80s. That will be very nice weather for rafting!

We expect higher water in June, so stay tuned for further announcements. Hope to see you in one of our boats real soon.

Rico, Jim and the smoker

Rico, Jim and the smoker

Jim, and his smoking hunks of meats

Jim, and his smoking hunks of meats

Wild Roses Along the Racecourse. It’s that time of year again, when the wild roses bloom along the Racecourse. Their fragrance beats domesticated roses hands down.

Wild roses, at the County Line take-out.

Wild roses, at the County Line take-out.

The apache plume are also blooming, and the canyon grape is leafing out. The flow is 1200 cfs, and will very likely continue to rise. Here’s another photo,  that is a real puzzler.

This is a basalt boulder that is found along Hwy 68. within a quarter-mile of the County Line take-out. See discussion that follows.

This is a basalt boulder that is found along Hwy 68. within a quarter-mile of the County Line take-out. See discussion that follows.

This boulder consists of separate, individual, lava flows. Here, the boulder sits in such a way that the oldest flow layer seen in the boulder faces up (the layer to the left). The individual flows incorporated into the boulder include one whose upper surface is decorated with a swirl pattern, which pattern was created as the lava slowed down and eddied, before hardening. This patterned surface acted as a mold, when it was covered by a subsequent flow. The lowermost surface of that overlying flow is a cast from that mold. The reddish rock surface, in the center, is the cast of the flow pattern found on the surface of the older flow (hidden from view).

Back to the Box

Steve Miller —  May 13, 2016

Back to the Box! We’re thrilled to have good flows for our Taos Box run, and have 7 guests there today (along with some Box guide trainees), who will enjoy 80 degree temperatures, bighorn sheep sightings and maybe even see the otters, or golden eagles, or migrating western tanagers … or who knows what? The Taos Box run is 16 miles of wilderness gorge, positioned in the heart of the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument, which has been set aside to preserve the land and riverscape of the Rio Grande Gorge of northern New Mexico.

We also have a boatload of guide trainees on the Racecourse run. Summer and whitewater action is here!!

Dead Car rapid, in the Taos Box

Dead Car rapid, in the Taos Box. Photo by Britt Runyon

 

How Deep is the Water?

Steve Miller —  April 25, 2016

How Deep is the Water?

More often than you might imagine, prospective rafting customers ask me: “How deep is the water?”. Many people suppose that water depth is the only measure by which to assess the risk of drowning. “Is it over my head?”, is the implicit question. Of course, you can drown in shallow water, if you are unlucky enough. But most people know that, besides containing water, rivers are not like lakes. And lakes and oceans are where most people drown. Many people who drown in natural water settings are involved in recreational motorized boating accidents, are NOT wearing life jackets (Personal Flotation Devices aka pfds) and don’t know how to swim.

Rivers are similar to lakes in that the water near shore is usually not as deep as far from shore, but that can vary tremendously. Otherwise, there are many differences. Most river recreationists wear PFDs, and ALL commercial rafting participants wear PFDs, and often helmets. Rivers have current, while lakes do not. Current can get you in trouble, if you either fall out of a boat or the boat is overturned, because you must take action on your own behalf to return to the boat, go to shore or grab and hold onto a rope thrown to you. If the flow in the river is high, the current is correspondingly faster and more powerful, making you work harder to save yourself. Failing to get out of the river promptly exposes you to hazards, such as submerging you in certain river features or against obstacles found in the river, like tree limbs, and hypothermia (being dangerously cooled). This is why prospective rafting participants should ask whether the flow is high or not – not how “deep” it is. Another question a prospective rafter should ask is how shallow the river is. At low water, more rocks in the riverbed will be exposed, making it difficult to navigate. You might ask: “Is portaging (carrying) the raft required?” Otherwise, rivers have both deep and shallow spots. Rivers are generally deeper where the current is slow, and shallower where the current is fast, such as in rapids. So, in rivers, the deeper places are the safer places. Rapids occur where the river channel is narrower, and/or where rocks are scattered throughout, and/or where the riverbed drops more quickly. Rapids are rated on a 1-6 scale, with Class 3 being moderate difficulty/moderate danger, and 4 being more difficult/more dangerous. Most commercial raft trips take place on Class 3 water. Class 4 is for those wanting a greater challenge, and who are ready to accept the greater risks of the raft flipping over or being thrown from the raft, and the requirement to deal with turbulent water while getting to safety.

Final Drop rapid

Final Drop Rapid – Class 3. Racecourse, Rio Grande

Buzzsaw Rapid

Buzzsaw Rapid – Class 3. Taos Box, Rio Grande

The tight squeeze at the entry to Dead Car Rapid

Dead Car Rapid – Class 4. Taos Box, Rio Grande. Photo by Britt Runyon

Commercial rafting choices on most rivers usually include “float” trips – either on Class 1 (no waves) or Class 2 (small waves/little danger) water.

funyaking the bosque

Class 1. The Bosque, Rio Grande. Photo by Britt Runyon

Upstream view towards the put-in

Class 2. Racecourse, Rio Grande

When I’m asked: “How deep is the water” and/or told that the prospective participant can’t swim, you can guess what kind of trip I recommend.

 

 

Testimonials!

Steve Miller —  March 30, 2016
Testimonials!

5star

Me and 6 others did the Taos Box with New Wave and our raft guide Britt was the best guide I’ve had throughoutmy many rafting trips across the U.S. He knew so much about the local area, geology (which was awesome because I’m a geologist) and knew the river like the back of his hand! Everyone was super friendly and they packed us a badass lunch. If you’re looking for a great rafting experience for a first timer or a veteran, New Wave is the place to go!
June 10, 2015

5star

Britt we had a blast with you down the race course, what a great guide! Also a big thanks to CJ & Britt for letting us try out the paddle boards it was a blast. Thankful for such great guides & extraordinary memories!
July 18, 2015
Britt, in our staff shirt

Britt, in our staff shirt